Category Archives: Manitoba

Canadian Museum for Human Rights (CMHR) Fall 2015 News

New play-based exhibit for children on its way to CMHR
Magna Carta exhibition closes after welcoming over 11,000 visitors
Winnipeg – September 24, 2015 – The Canadian Museum for Human Rights (CMHR) is getting ready to welcome a new hands-on exhibit for children next month after bidding farewell to Magna Carta.
XOXO: An Exhibit About Love and Forgiveness
will open to visitors inside the Museum’s new Level 1 Gallery on October 4 and run until January 3, 2016. Through play-based learning, the exhibit will help kids explore notions of human dignity, respect and equality – concepts that serve as foundations for later human rights learning.
Children will enter a lively, colourful exhibit about feelings. They will play and have fun, act silly, consider what makes them sad, mad and happy, and be encouraged to think about love and forgiveness. The travelling exhibition – appropriate for  even the youngest members of the family — was created by the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh with support from the Fetzer Institute.

XOXO: An Exhibit About Love and Forgiveness will be the second exhibition in the Museum’s Level 1 Gallery, a 450-square-metre space completed in June 2015 with state-of-the-art technology and climate controls that enable the Museum to host exhibits of any size and type.
The first travelling exhibition in the gallery, “Magna Carta: Law, Liberty and Legacy“, closed last Friday (September 18) after a five-week run that welcomed 11,600 visitors to view one of the world’s most famous historic charters, alongside some of Canada’s
most important foundational documents. The exhibition celebrated the 800th anniversary of the great charter that laid the foundation for basic principles of democracy and human rights.
“We began in the past and now move to the future, with a wonderful exhibition aimed at the next generation of human rights defenders,” said CMHR president and CEO John Young. “Development of human rights concepts are for all ages, including the youth. We know they resonate from our school programs and summer day camps.  Our new exhibit will give families, daycares and children’s groups another reason to visit Canada’s new national museum. We hope it will prompt family conversations about how we treat and interact with each other.”
An online game connected to the Magna Carta exhibition, developed by the CMHR, will continue to  be available through the Museum’s website. The game, called “Making Meaning: Images and Perceptions” is intended to provoke thought and discussion about the way human
rights history can be reinforced or distorted.
Magna Carta and its companion document, the Charter of the Forest, were on loan from Durham Cathedral in the United Kingdom in an exhibition tour organized by Magna Carta Canada, developed by Lord Cultural Resources. The exhibition makes its next stop in Toronto’s Fort York National Historic Site, starting October 4. The CMHR had developed a unique companion exhibit for the Winnipeg leg of the tour, focused on Canada’s own constitutional documents – on loan from Library and Archives Canada– and their connection to rights and freedoms.
The Canadian Museum for Human Rights is the first museum in the world solely dedicated to the evolution, celebration and future of human rights. Using multimedia technology and other innovative approaches, the CMHR creates inspiring encounters with human
rights for all ages, in a visitor experience unlike any other.

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Canadian Museum for Human Rights  85 Israel Asper Way | Winnipeg, Manitoba | R3C
0L5 | (204) 289-2000 | Toll-free: 1-877-877-6037  |  TTY 204-289-2050 humanrights.ca

Canada Day at our new national museum: human rights come alive

Winnipeg – June 26, 2015 – Human rights come alive at Canada’s new national museum on July 1 with music and family-friendly programming throughout the day. The Canadian Museum for Human Rights (CMHR) will offer musical performances, participatory activities, a scavenger hunt, as well as tours and programs designed to spark thought and conversation about human rights. July 1 to 7 is also Canada History Week.

The Israel Asper Tower of Hope will also glow maple-leaf red on Wednesday night from dusk to dawn in honour of our country’s birthday. Three Canadian flags will fly from dawn July 1 to dawn July 2.

Combined with other activities at The Forks, high numbers of visitors are expected on Canada Day at the Museum – a great place for visuals and interview opportunities focused on our country’s achievements and challenges. The Museum is open from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. on July 1, which also makes it the perfect spot to visit before the fireworks begin!

WHAT: Canada Day performances and programs at the CMHR

WHEN: July 1, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.

PLUS: Glowing RED Tower of Hope – July 1 starting at dusk

WHERE: CMHR, 85 Israel Asper Way

Entry into the Museum is subject to regular admission fees ($15 for adults).

Performances:

11:30 a.m. – Winnipeg Youth Chorus, Bonnie & John Buhler Hall (Level 1) – free

1:30 p.m. – Music in the Garden of Contemplation (Level 3): French Press – acoustic performance by Franco-manitoban singer-songwriter Chantal Emond

4 p.m. – Music in the Garden: William Prince, First Nations singer-songwriter

7:30 p.m. – Music in the Garden: French Press – Chantal Emond

Activities (throughout the day)

“Ideas for Your Visit” (family orientation) – Bonnie & John Buhler Hall (Level 1)


Scavenger hunt – starts in Bonnie & John Buhler Hall (Level 1)


Hands-on craft activity for families, Rights Take Flight – Canadian Journeys gallery (Level 2)


Participatory activity for families, Rights on the Move – Level 5 Terrace


Share your thoughts: complete “On Canada Day, I imagine….” cards — Inspiring Change (Level 7)


Interpretation from the Israel Asper Tower of Hope, 1 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Tours

Explore the Galleries” tours in English or French offered at 10:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. (90 minutes) and at 11:30 a.m., 2:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. (60 minutes). Additional fee ($5 for adults) on top of admission

CMHR announces September 2014 opening date

 

 

 

CMHR announces September 2014 opening date

WINNIPEG – November 4, 2013 – The Canadian Museum for Human Rights (CMHR) will open its doors to the world on September 20, 2014, its President and CEO announced today at a briefing with industry partners.

“A national project of this scope and scale comes along just once in a generation,” Stuart Murray said. “When the doors of this building open next September, it will be a historic moment for Canada and a proud day for Manitoba, as we welcome visitors from across the country and around the world.”

CMHR Board Chair Eric Hughes said the Museum reflects the best of what Canada has to offer to the world. “It doesn’t matter which province or territory you’re from. This museum belongs to all of us: to you in Manitoba, to me from Alberta, to each citizen from coast to coast to coast,” he said. “This project reflects the values we cherish as a nation. By celebrating our success and reflecting on our failings, the CMHR will be a beacon of learning and inspiration for Canadians.”  

“The Canadian Museum for Human Rights is putting Winnipeg and Canada on the map as a destination for human rights scholarship and tourism,” said Canadian Tourism Commission (CTC) Senior Vice President of Marketing Greg Klassen. “People are more aware of human rights issues than ever before, which opens exciting new tourism markets for travellers who want unique experiences that will move and inspire them.”

“The Museum will be a catalyst for educational tourism targeting the youth market,” she said. “This is significant because the student and youth market is growing faster than any other segment,” Sandron said.

Tourism Winnipeg Senior Vice President Chantal Sturk-Nadeau, said future conventions have been booked in Winnipeg because of the Museum, while tour operators and independent travellers are waiting to add the CMHR to their leisure and group travel plans.

“Winnipeg is undergoing an exciting renaissance thanks to the opening of CMHR, a world-class polar bear exhibit being built at Assiniboine Park, the return of professional hockey, a brand new airport and many other exciting developments,” she said. “This creates a tremendous opportunity to package Winnipeg as a distinct travel destination in ways that were not possible before.”

Confirmation of the Museum’s opening date sets planning in motion for an inaugural year of celebratory events, expected to attract interest from across the country and require help from more than 200 volunteers.

Gail Asper, National Campaign Chair for Friends of the CMHR, said it is exciting to see the vision of her father coming to life. The late Dr. Israel Asper believed in creating a place that would educate and inspire a new generation of human rights champions, built as a partnership between the public and private sectors.

“Opening the Museum doors is not an end, but a beginning,” Asper said. “With the help of more than 7,000 donors who believe in the power of human rights, we have been able to set the dream in motion. However, there is still much work to be done to ensure this inspiring project lives up to the potential we all envision, helping our children and grandchildren become educated and aware of the value of taking action for human rights in Canada and around the world.”

The CMHR is the first museum in the world solely dedicated to the evolution, celebration and future of human rights. It is the first national museum in Canada to be built outside the National Capital Region. The Museum will use immersive multi-media technology and other innovative approaches to create an inspiring encounter with human rights unlike anything visitors have experienced before.

CMHR and The Manitoba Museum forge partnership to attract visitors, showcase history

CMHR | MCDP

CMHR and The Manitoba Museum forge partnership to attract visitors, showcase history

WINNIPEG – September 27, 2013 – The Canadian Museum for Human Rights (CMHR) and The Manitoba Museum (TMM) today signed an important agreement to collaborate in areas such as marketing, educational programs, collections, exhibits and knowledge.

“Together, our museums will create a visitor experience like no other in the world,” CMHR president and CEO Stuart Murray said at a news event held today in TMM’s Urban Gallery. “Our unique approaches will strengthen each other for the benefit of this community, promoting both global human rights and Manitoba’s rich cultural heritage.”

The collections-based expertise of TMM complements and enhances the ideas-based approach of the CMHR. The two museums will share artifacts and expertise, develop programs and exhibits together, and work on cross-promotional tourism marketing. Similar agreements are being sought with Winnipeg’s other major cultural institutions.

“We now have an amazing opportunity to build on a ‘critical mass’ of museological excellence – located mere blocks from each other,” TMM CEO Claudette Leclerc said. “Not only is Winnipeg destined to become a national hub for human rights education, it can also become the city of Museum excellence with even more Canadians and tourists being exposed to our world-class interpretation, dioramas and educational programming.”

Winnipeg General Strike artifacts to be loaned to CMHR

For example, the CMHR has arranged to borrow from TMM key artifacts from the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike – a pivotal event in the history of Canadian labour rights. These include a Special Police armband, a Special Constable badge, a billy club, a photo plate depicting imprisoned Strike leaders, and a “One Big Union” lapel pin.

CMHR curatorial advisor Sharon Reilly spent 30 years as a TMM curator, where she developed its labour history collection, curated temporary exhibits on the Strike and helped produce an educational kit on the Strike for Manitoba students. TMM’s Urban Gallery was designed to interpret Winnipeg in the fall of 1920, in the aftermath of the Strike, portraying the socio-economic conditions underlying the confrontation.

“Labour rights are an important subject for the CMHR, and one where TMM has a wealth of resources,” Murray said. “Our Museum will not only feature an exhibit about the Winnipeg General Strike, but also include over 25 different Canadian and international exhibits and stories about workers’ rights throughout its galleries.”

TMM’s outstanding collections of Indigenous materials, and a Hudson’s Bay Company Museum Collection described as “Manitoba’s national treasure”, are among other key assets for joint programming and exhibit development. In addition, TMM’s expertise in archaeological research and collections management may someday assist with interpretation of important artifacts from the CMHR excavation of 2008 to 2012.

The Manitoba Museum is a non-profit organization and the province´s most-visited paid attraction. It has an award-winning Natural and Human History Museum, a Science Gallery, and one of Canada’s most advanced all-dome planetariums. The Museum also cares for over 2.8 million artifacts on behalf of all Manitobans.

Opening in 2014 in Winnipeg, the CMHR is the first museum solely dedicated to the evolution, celebration and future of human rights. It is the first national museum to be established in Canada since 1967 and the first outside the National Capital Region.