Tag Archives: human rights

New exhibition opens on International Human Rights Day

New exhibition opens on International Human Rights Day
Free admission, Inuit drumming, curator talk on December 10

Winnipeg – December 7, 2017 — A new exhibition at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights brings human rights stories to life using interactive technology from different eras in Canadian history.

Rights of Passage: Canada at 150 invites visitors to peer through the lens of four different eras since 1867 to learn how people were thinking about human rights at the time. Projected wampum beads dance to the sound of your voice, shifting into designs created by art students at Winnipeg’s Children of the Earth High School. A dress made from wearable technology (fibre optic fabric, laser wire and LED lights) changes colours when you step on a hashtag. A Victorian-era “magic lantern” projects images of early human rights struggles.

Visitors can also tune in to war-time broadcasts on a period radio set, switch channels on 1970s vintage TV screens, or watch Instagram posts appear above shifting holograms. Indigenous oral traditions are also showcased as an enduring source of knowledge.

The last of four special exhibitions presented for Canada 150, Rights of Passage opens to the public at 10 a.m. on International Human Rights Day (Sunday, December 10), with free admission to the Museum all day.

An official opening event begins at 2 p.m. in Bonnie & John Buhler Hall, including drumming by Inuit Elder David Serkoak – who contributed to the exhibition as a survivor of the 1950s forced relocations of the Ahiarmiut people in the Far North (Farley Mowat’s “People of the Deer”). Curator Karine Duhamel and Design & Production Manager Rob Vincent will then lead a discussion about the new exhibition.

Earlier in the day, a Canadian citizenship ceremony takes place from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. and the Winnipeg Youth Chorus performs in the Stuart Clark Garden of Contemplation from 1 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.

Next to the new exhibition on Level 6, a family activity will be offered from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., provoking thought about the power of words, voice and oral history in affecting human rights. Participants will consider how their own history, culture, traditions and world views have shaped their perspectives.

Located in the Level 6 Expressions gallery, Rights of Passage takes a fresh look at events that influenced human rights at different times in Canadian history. It includes personal accounts of Indigenous Peoples’ efforts to resist assimilation, preserve a unique history and alter the path of the future. Examples of its diverse stories can be found on the CMHR web site.

The exhibition is divided into five zones:

1) 1867-1914 – Foundations and Dislocations. Designed with wood, newsprint, bill posters and lead type, this zone looks at issues facing the new nation of Canada and the First Nations who were already here: early workers’ struggles, colonization, social reform, fundamental freedoms and treaties with Indigenous people. A Victorian-era magic lantern projects images on the wall.

2) 1914-1960 – Transformations and Interventions. Designed using steel and industrial materials, this zone examines effects of the two world wars and the Great Depression. It explores stories of people taking action, use of state power to curtail civil liberties, the government’s policy of assimilation and the transformation of politics. A large, wooden radio plays replicas of broadcast speeches from the era.

3) 1960-1982 – Towards the Charter. Designed with plastic and 1970s orange-and-yellow details, this zone explores the turbulent years as Canadian society became more diverse. Its stories cover nationalism and pluralism, social security and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. TV sets from the 1970s play relevant newscasts of the day.

4) 1982 to 2017 – Human Rights in Contemporary Canada. Designed with LED lights and fibre optics, this zone looks at Canada’s expanding role in the world, the effects of national security on civil liberties, reconciliation with Indigenous peoples and issues arising from digital communications, diverse gender identities and environmental challenges. A dress made of wearable technology responds to floor-projected hashtags.

5) Defending sovereignty. Designed with projection and graphics inspired by wampum beads, this zone looks at Indigenous rights through the lens of stories about forcible relocation, the burden of peace, effects of environmental degradation, inclusion of the Métis as Indigenous peoples, and the right to recognition. The interactive bead projection responds to visitor voices in recognition of the importance of the spoken word and oral traditions. Designs were created by art students at Children of the Earth High School in Winnipeg.

The Expressions gallery is generously supported by the Richardson Foundation & Family.

Toyota Cambridge Assembly Plant Tour

Toyota Visitors Centre
Toyota Visitors Centre

Toyota Cambridge Assembly Plant Tour

It all started with the usual long, one-hour drive out of Toronto, but soon we were there. As we headed in to the visitor centre we discussed our first impressions. Inside the centre we found many exhibits of the Toyota history and models of the past and present. After a short safety video in the conference room we made our preparations to step in to the factory.

Toyota Plant Tours in Canada
Toyota Plant Tours in Canada

As we began the tour we immediately took note of the extreme cleanliness of the factory. Sadly though visitors and employees are not allowed to bring any of their beloved personal electronics into the factory (no selfies), we are not able to show you the amazing robots and technology that were within the factory. Shortly after we climbed in to the trams that would drive us around the plant. The first stop was the west stamping area where they would take massive sheets of steel and use a multi-ton weight to stamp them (these where not in action when we were there).

 

Informative Free Tours to Toyota Plant near Cambridge, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada
Informative Free Tours to Toyota Plant near Cambridge, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada

The stamper had to be supported by concrete to prevent a mini earthquake every time they where in action. After, we visited the main assembly where we saw cars hanging above us as they were coming fresh out of paint, soon we headed to the west weld where the 10 thousand pound “Godzilla” robot moved multi ton cars around. The welding section impressed us with 600 separate robots. After seeing the sparks fly, we headed down to the final assembly line where the cars are started up for the first time. This one-hour super informative trip felt too short as we headed through the final corridor and back to the visitor centre. We where impressed that the Toyoda family built up from being a automated sewing business.

You can arrange the Free tour only week in advance by visiting TMMC.ca webiste or by phone:(519) 653-1111 x 2270 Keep in mind no walk in tours. Printable map of TMMC

Downloadable Toyota Tours brochure

Canadian Museum for Human Rights (CMHR) Fall 2015 News

New play-based exhibit for children on its way to CMHR
Magna Carta exhibition closes after welcoming over 11,000 visitors
Winnipeg – September 24, 2015 – The Canadian Museum for Human Rights (CMHR) is getting ready to welcome a new hands-on exhibit for children next month after bidding farewell to Magna Carta.
XOXO: An Exhibit About Love and Forgiveness
will open to visitors inside the Museum’s new Level 1 Gallery on October 4 and run until January 3, 2016. Through play-based learning, the exhibit will help kids explore notions of human dignity, respect and equality – concepts that serve as foundations for later human rights learning.
Children will enter a lively, colourful exhibit about feelings. They will play and have fun, act silly, consider what makes them sad, mad and happy, and be encouraged to think about love and forgiveness. The travelling exhibition – appropriate for  even the youngest members of the family — was created by the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh with support from the Fetzer Institute.

XOXO: An Exhibit About Love and Forgiveness will be the second exhibition in the Museum’s Level 1 Gallery, a 450-square-metre space completed in June 2015 with state-of-the-art technology and climate controls that enable the Museum to host exhibits of any size and type.
The first travelling exhibition in the gallery, “Magna Carta: Law, Liberty and Legacy“, closed last Friday (September 18) after a five-week run that welcomed 11,600 visitors to view one of the world’s most famous historic charters, alongside some of Canada’s
most important foundational documents. The exhibition celebrated the 800th anniversary of the great charter that laid the foundation for basic principles of democracy and human rights.
“We began in the past and now move to the future, with a wonderful exhibition aimed at the next generation of human rights defenders,” said CMHR president and CEO John Young. “Development of human rights concepts are for all ages, including the youth. We know they resonate from our school programs and summer day camps.  Our new exhibit will give families, daycares and children’s groups another reason to visit Canada’s new national museum. We hope it will prompt family conversations about how we treat and interact with each other.”
An online game connected to the Magna Carta exhibition, developed by the CMHR, will continue to  be available through the Museum’s website. The game, called “Making Meaning: Images and Perceptions” is intended to provoke thought and discussion about the way human
rights history can be reinforced or distorted.
Magna Carta and its companion document, the Charter of the Forest, were on loan from Durham Cathedral in the United Kingdom in an exhibition tour organized by Magna Carta Canada, developed by Lord Cultural Resources. The exhibition makes its next stop in Toronto’s Fort York National Historic Site, starting October 4. The CMHR had developed a unique companion exhibit for the Winnipeg leg of the tour, focused on Canada’s own constitutional documents – on loan from Library and Archives Canada– and their connection to rights and freedoms.
The Canadian Museum for Human Rights is the first museum in the world solely dedicated to the evolution, celebration and future of human rights. Using multimedia technology and other innovative approaches, the CMHR creates inspiring encounters with human
rights for all ages, in a visitor experience unlike any other.

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Canadian Museum for Human Rights  85 Israel Asper Way | Winnipeg, Manitoba | R3C
0L5 | (204) 289-2000 | Toll-free: 1-877-877-6037  |  TTY 204-289-2050 humanrights.ca

Canada Day at our new national museum: human rights come alive

Winnipeg – June 26, 2015 – Human rights come alive at Canada’s new national museum on July 1 with music and family-friendly programming throughout the day. The Canadian Museum for Human Rights (CMHR) will offer musical performances, participatory activities, a scavenger hunt, as well as tours and programs designed to spark thought and conversation about human rights. July 1 to 7 is also Canada History Week.

The Israel Asper Tower of Hope will also glow maple-leaf red on Wednesday night from dusk to dawn in honour of our country’s birthday. Three Canadian flags will fly from dawn July 1 to dawn July 2.

Combined with other activities at The Forks, high numbers of visitors are expected on Canada Day at the Museum – a great place for visuals and interview opportunities focused on our country’s achievements and challenges. The Museum is open from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. on July 1, which also makes it the perfect spot to visit before the fireworks begin!

WHAT: Canada Day performances and programs at the CMHR

WHEN: July 1, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.

PLUS: Glowing RED Tower of Hope – July 1 starting at dusk

WHERE: CMHR, 85 Israel Asper Way

Entry into the Museum is subject to regular admission fees ($15 for adults).

Performances:

11:30 a.m. – Winnipeg Youth Chorus, Bonnie & John Buhler Hall (Level 1) – free

1:30 p.m. – Music in the Garden of Contemplation (Level 3): French Press – acoustic performance by Franco-manitoban singer-songwriter Chantal Emond

4 p.m. – Music in the Garden: William Prince, First Nations singer-songwriter

7:30 p.m. – Music in the Garden: French Press – Chantal Emond

Activities (throughout the day)

“Ideas for Your Visit” (family orientation) – Bonnie & John Buhler Hall (Level 1)


Scavenger hunt – starts in Bonnie & John Buhler Hall (Level 1)


Hands-on craft activity for families, Rights Take Flight – Canadian Journeys gallery (Level 2)


Participatory activity for families, Rights on the Move – Level 5 Terrace


Share your thoughts: complete “On Canada Day, I imagine….” cards — Inspiring Change (Level 7)


Interpretation from the Israel Asper Tower of Hope, 1 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Tours

Explore the Galleries” tours in English or French offered at 10:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. (90 minutes) and at 11:30 a.m., 2:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. (60 minutes). Additional fee ($5 for adults) on top of admission